31st ICM Triennial Congress


  • Toronto, Ontario Canada

Monday, June 19th 2pm

Karen Strange presents 'Neonatal Transitional Physiology (optimal cord clamping) and how the first few breaths clear fetal lung fluid' at the Improving Neonatal Care Session.

In the past few years, there’s been an abundance of information regarding the benefits of leaving the cord intact. Yet, immediate cord clamping is the standard of care, throughout most of the world, including resource poor areas. This lecture focuses on Transitional Physiology (optimal cord clamping) and how the first few breaths clear the fluid in the lungs.

Having an actual visual representation (mental map) of the physiological path of blood into the heart and lungs will better prepare midwives in “knowing normal” and how to respond in all birth scenarios, including when to and when not to take action. Ventilation of the lungs, by the midwife, is the most important and effective action, in slow transitioning babies and those in respiratory distress.

This lecture will expand the current understanding of what happens when the cord is left intact, incorporating the physiology of clearing the newborn’s fluid filled lungs in the first few breaths and what happens with the blood, before, during, and after baby is born.